Archive for Dinner

Wild Rice & Chicken Soup

Posted in Cooking, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe, soup with tags , , , , , , , on December 15, 2010 by helenphillips
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From this.... (the raw condition)

Wild Rice (which is actually a grass) grows in abundance in Minnesota, so it is unsurprising that it is a favourite in local cuisine. I had my first taste several years ago when we first visited the Twin Cities as part relocation decision making process. We spent a day being taken around various residences by a Real Estate agent so that we could consider where we would like to be living, and importantly, what we needed to budget for. At lunch time, we were taken to Lucia’s in Uptown. Lucia’s is a small restaurant that changes it’s menu weekly in tune with seasonal produce. On this particular day I did not feel like a large lunch, and fortunately for me the Soup of the Day was Wild Rice Soup. Just delicious.

So, when we moved here, wild rice was one of the first store cupboard items I bought, but it’s taken me longer than planned to do anything with it. My husband likes to have soup to take to work for lunch, so I like to keep a stock of various flavours in the freezer – roasted tomato, lentil & tomato, chicken & sweetcorn.   The soup I had at Lucia’s was a creamy one, but here I have left out the cream. It makes a lovely chunky soup, so if you are feeling virtuous you can always omit the side of bread and still feel satisfied. This makes 2 portions suitable for lunch or even an evening meal appetizer.

  • 1/4 cup uncooked wild rice – this gives just under 2 cups when cooked
  • 1 chicken thigh, diced
  • 1 small onion (or large shallot) sliced
  • 5 mushroom – chopped into small pieces
  • 0.5L chicken stock
  • Seasoning

There are 2 ways you can go about this – cook the wild rice ahead, or bung it all in together. I went for the former, because having never cooked wild rice before, I didn’t really know exactly how much it would expand by. You need to use 4 x the amount of water, so in this case 1 cup. Slightly salt, bring to the boil and simmer for around 50 minutes until the rice is cooked and water is absorbed.

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...to this.... (cooked rice)

Using a non-stick pan, I cooked the chicken pieces over a medium heat until sealed. Next I added the onions, and cooked for a few minutes, before adding in the mushrooms. Once the vegetables were soft, I added seasoning, and then the stock. I briefly raised the temperature to bring the soup to the boil, and then reduced to a simmer before adding in the cooked rice. I left it simmering for about 20 minutes, before decanting into pots ready for my husband to pack away for his lunch.

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...to lunch (wild rice soup)

 

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Turkey Pie

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , , on December 1, 2010 by helenphillips

Mention pie to the average American, and they will think Apple, Peanut, Pumpkin. Basically anything that can be (optionally) served with cream or ice-cream. Mention pie to the average Briton and they will think Steak & Kidney, Beef & Onion, Chicken & Mushroom. It’s not that we don’t have sweet pies too, it’s just the savoury kind takes precedence in our culinary culture.  I don’t think I’ve seen any savoury pies on sale since we moved here, though of course that doesn’t mean they don’t exist.

With Thanksgiving just last week, I have been left with the inevitable pile of leftover Turkey to try and use ‘creatively’. I find the downside of Turkey is no matter how juicy and moist it is when it’s served fresh, once it has been carved and refrigerated, it has a tendency to dry out. This is why I prefer to use the leftover meat in dishes with some sort of sauce or gravy. The last time I was faced with a similar mountain of Turkey, a pie was top of the list, and so it is again. Tonight we dine on Meat Pie & proper thick cut deep fried chips (not fries!). With malt vinegar.

As usual, I have just thrown in quantities of each ingredient that looks about right so the amounts are approximations. The filling can be used immediately, or prepared in advance.

Gives 4-6 portions.

  • 15 oz / 425g Shortcrust (or pie) pastry (I cheat and use ready made and rolled stuff)
  • 500g Cooked Turkey, cut into small chunks
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion (I used a red one today)
  • 16oz / 500g mushrooms
  • canned sweetcorn
  • 300 ml Stock (I used stock made from the Turkey carcass, you can substitute chicken or vegetable stock)
  • Tarragon, Thyme, Parsley
  • 1 tablespoon Cornflour / Cornstarch, dissolved in cold water
  • Seasoning
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten

Heat the olive oil in a non-stick pan, and then fry the vegetables until they have softened. Next add the herbs, and seasoning, followed by the stock. Bring to the boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes, which should reduce the liquid by approximately half. Stir in the Turkey and then the cornflour & water.

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C / 400°F. Grease a deep pan, approx 9″ in diameter.  If necessary, roll the pastry into 2 equally sized pieces, and line the bottom and sides of the pan with one.

Fill the pastry with the prepared filling, and then use the 2nd piece of pastry, and press the 2 pieces together around the edges. Brush the surface with the egg.

Bake in the oven for approx 50 minutes, until the pastry surface is golden brown. Enjoy with vegetables and potato product of your choice.

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Thanksgiving Feast

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, events, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , on November 23, 2010 by helenphillips

So this Thursday is Thanksgiving, and as we have only been in the US for 7 months, it’s our first.

New England,  Autumn 1621 – the early settlers that had managed to survive the first harsh year (as a whole, they had arrived unprepared) gathered together for a celebration that was to consist of 3 days of eating, drinking, dancing and playing games. They were joined by their neighbours, the Wampanoag tribe, who had dropped by to see what all the shooting was about. However, Thanksgiving didn’t become an annual tradition until the 1780s, and became a national holiday in 1863. And now Thanksgiving is the day of the year (always the last Thursday in November) dedicated to eating copious amounts of food, and settling down to a game of football.

Thanksgiving is also a time for parades, the most famous (and largest) of which is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade in Manhattan. Here in Minneapolis, Friday sees the start of the annual Holidazzle celebration, which will continue every weekend through December.

The day after Thanksgiving is known as Black Friday. As gloomy as it sounds, it actually marks the start of the Christmas shopping season, and is famous for it’s sales madness (people have been know to be trampled in the rush to get to the bargains). One chain of stores has been advertising that they will open at 3am on Friday, but I am determined to stick to internet shopping.

Our Thanksgiving Day will be spent with just the two of us eating and drinking more than is usually sensible. Having done some research into traditional dishes (most of which seem to involve copious amounts of butter and/or cream), I think it’s safe to say that the most traditional part of our feast will be the Turkey and the Cranberry Sauce. The trimmings are mostly influenced by our own British Christmas favourites – for this year at least. So here’s what’s on the Menu –

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The tomato soup recipe comes from Gordon Ramsay’s Secrets, and is the first of his recipes I ever tried. I remember being quite intimidated by the book back then, but excited by the beautiful and colourful images. Over time I have gained more confidence (and a roomier Kitchen), and the recipes don’t seem so daunting now. The soup has already been made, making life a tiny bit simpler on Thursday.

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The Turkey will be roasted – I’m not inclined to try the other method that is traditional in the US, which is deep frying. As there are only 2 of us eating on the day, we bought the smallest crown / breast we could find, which is still around 5lbs. I expect to be making lots of use of leftover turkey recipes in the months to come.

The Cranberry Sauce will the same that I’ve made for the previous 2 Christmas dinners. This year, we’ll also have Lingonberry sauce. Lingonberries come from Sweden, where Eddie spent most of his working life before we moved to the US, so an extra sauce was his suggestion after spotting the berries in the supermarket.

The Chestnut Stuffing will be based on a recipe from Nigella Lawson’s Feast. Unfortunately I am currently having difficulty obtained canned puréed chestnuts, so some modification may be required!

The rest of the accompaniments will simply be roast potatoes (the American favourite seems to be creamy mashed), parsnips, savoy cabbage (this at least will be buttery), peas, and pigs in blankets. For those not familiar with the term, these are sausages wrapped in bacon, and the omission of these would cause great consternation.

Finally (possibly after a break, and a walk), dessert will be Crème Brulee (Aha! There will be a creamy dish). This will be the most challenging dish of the day for me, as it is my first attempt. If it’s a success, maybe I’ll even blog about it….

Happy Holidays!

Chicken Sliders

Posted in Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , , , on November 17, 2010 by helenphillips

16th November 2010 - Chicken Slider

For the Non-Americans among you, sliders are simply miniature burgers. And as with most food in miniature, there’s something quite special about them. Inspired by the mention of chicken burgers in Gordon Ramsay’s Healthy Appetite, I decided it was time to break out the slider pan. Rather niftily, this press and pan in one makes 6 sliders at a time, which are around 2.5″ in diameter, and around 0.5″ in thickness. Very cute.

Usually home-made burgers are used by mixing minced meat (of whichever variety) together with the rest of the ingredients. I don’t have a mincer, so used the food processor to both chop and blend ingredients. So feel free to experiment!

The following ingredients were used to make a total of 12 sliders. I would estimate that the same amount would make 4 ‘normal’ burgers.

  • 3 chicken thighs
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon each of parsley & chives
  • 1 egg
  • Seasoning

First of all I used the food processor to finely mince the red onion. Next I added the minced garlic, herbs and chicken thighs (rather lazily I threw these in whole, but the blades easily coped!). Once I was satisfied with the chicken was adequately chopped, I added the egg, and seasoning, and ran the food processor long enough to blend the ingredients.

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If you are making burgers the traditional way, then the next stage should be to fashion the mixture into patties, wrap tightly in cling film, and then put them in the fridge for an hour to firm up. Luckily for me (as my burgers ALWAYS fall apart), using the combined press/pan eliminates this. I was able to simply scoop the mixture (using the provided measure) into the pre-heated pan, press, and cook away for about 5 minutes. Of course, there are several alternative ways to the cooking stage – oven grill, outdoor grill / barbecue, griddle. Whichever way you choose, I find brushing a little olive oil on the burger (or the griddle) before cooking prevents sticking. Depending on how thick you make the patties, they should take 5-10 minutes to cook using a medium heat, but as this is chicken, please ensure it is cooked right through before serving!

All that remains are the final touches – add the sliders/burgers to buns loaded with your favourite items. In my case, I had green salad, tomato, burger relish and ketchup. These sliders fit perfectly into just half a small bun! Out of view is the huge pile of oven cooked potato wedges that I served as a side dish.

Summer Pasta

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , on May 17, 2010 by helenphillips

What’s this? A food post? It’s been a while, but it’s about time this blog returned to it’s roots. Unsurprisingly, moving across the Atlantic has taken over everything. My cookbooks and kitchen equipment are all in a container waiting to be shipped across the ocean, so I’ve been pretty much sticking to well known recipes. But today I fancied something different. The sun has made a comeback to Minnesota, so something summery for dinner was called for. We had roast chicken for dinner yesterday, so the other requirement was to use some of the leftovers. Beth at Jam and Clotted Cream blogged a fantastic looking Lemon Carbonara a few days back, which obviously planted some seeds in my mind, and I was fancying pasta. I don’t often do pasta with chicken, as it usually means a creamy sauce, and I’m not a huge fan. My husband is even awkwarder, and doesn’t do cream or cheese! I also had some asparagus, which always goes nicely with chicken. I’m going to leave quantities to viewer discretion, as I didn’t measure anything as I threw in ingredients, so please, adjust to your own tastes!

First off, I pre-cooked the asparagus. I would have steamed it, but my lovely silicone steamer basket is in the aforementioned container, so they were boiled.

The other ingredients included sliced onion, and sliced mushrooms, which were sautéed until soft. The next additions were a jalapeño pepper (which actually failed to give the dish any heat), and garlic. These were followed by halved cherry tomatoes (to make the sauce a bit juicier), and then basil and seasoning.

The final additions to the sauce were the cooked chicken and asparagus. The pasta only took 5 minutes to cook, so just enough to make sure the final ingredients were heated right through.

For the past few years I have always bought fresh pasta, rather than dried. I haven’t seen any here yet, so may have to make my own once my pasta machine makes an appearance with the rest of our goods. The pasta of choice today was Angel Hair, and a low carb product which I haven’t seen before. Dreamfields make a range of pasta which are low in carbs, lower GI, and higher fibre. And it tastes great! Bargain. The second photo shows the cooked pasta shortly before I dropped the fork in the boiling water. And then on my bare foot.

To make this dish perfect, add some parmasan. Then pour yourself a glass of white wine (Pinot Grigio?), and take your plate outside and dine alfresco.

Chicken Risotto

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , on January 13, 2010 by helenphillips

Ages and ages ago, I posted a mushroom risotto recipe, which had been created from a seemingly bare cupboard. The challenge was slightly different this time – I had chicken, chicken stock, and needed something to fulfil my new and exciting(!) diet regimen – and isn’t as pretty!  As always, we had lots of Arborio rice in the store cupboard (so much in fact, we’re going to have to eat a lot of it before moving!), so risotto seemed a viable option. Being new to this WeightWatchers milarky, I thought I’d check their site to see how risotto fits in which their concept. I very easily found a recipe for mushroom risotto, for 5 points, so it would seem that the rice isn’t too bad a thing. This encouraged me to make up my own chicken version, also using what vegetables I had. So, here’s what I came up with for 6.5 points:

  • Spray light (around 5 sprays)
  • 15g dried mushrooms (I used Asda’s ‘Exotic Mix’)
  • 30g roasted chicken (leftover from Sunday in this case)
  • 1 garlic clove (or teaspoon if using a lazy version)
  • 60g courgette
  • 40g white mushrooms
  • 70g red onion, finely chopped
  • 60ml white wine (you can use red, but I find it turns the rice pink!)
  • 75g Arborio rice
  • 375ml chicken stock (I make my own, making sure any fat is skimmed off)
  • Salt’n’Pepper to taste

Soak the dried mushrooms in enough hot water to cover, according to the packet instructions. Heat a non-stick pan, and spray with the fry light. Add in onion, and cook gently for a few minutes, before stirring in the garlic, white mushrooms, and courgette. When the vegetables have softened, stir in the rice, and then the wine. Stir occasionally until the wine is absorbed. Then start to add the stock, a little at a time, remembering to keep stirring so that it doesn’t stick. Add more stock as it gets absorbed. Once all the stock is added, test the rice to see if it is ready. You may need a little extra water, but I didn’t find that to be the case. Season to taste.

Of course, if you want to push the boat out, stir in a little butter and/or parmasan at the end!

January 12th 2010 - Chicken Risotto

Pan Fried Salmon with Vegetables

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , on January 12, 2010 by helenphillips

Salmon is a rare treat for me, because my husband really doesn’t like fish. At all. So, whilst he’s away, I like to sneak in a portion and enjoy it all by myself.

I added a bit of an oriental twist by using soy sauce & oyster sauce, along with stir-fried vegetables, including some Choi Sum. I’ve never come across this before, but it’s a relative of Pak Choi, and can be used stir-fried or raw in salads. I found it had a stronger, more peppery taste than Pak Choi.

Recipe (for 1)

  • 80ml dried basmati rice
  • Fry Light Oil
  • 1 Salmon Fillet
  • 2 Spring Onions, chopped
  • 1/4 courgette, sliced
  • 1/4 red pepper, sliced into strips
  • 2 medium sized mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 head of Choi Sum (about 5/6 stalks). Remove the leaves, and chop the stalks into bite size.
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce

Start the rice first, I usually find it takes around 12 minutes, which should time well with the main event.

Heat a frying pan, and add a few squirts of fry light when hot. Add the Salmon to the pan, and gently cook for a few minutes. Add the vegetables, with the exception of the Choi Sum leaves. Stir the vegetables occasionally, and turn the Salmon to cook evenly.  When the vegetables start to soften, stir in the Oyster & Soy Sauce. The last step is to add in the Choi Sum leaves, which will only take a minute or so.

Throw* the rice into a bow, and stir in the veg to coat with the sauce. Serve with the Salmon on top. Scoff.

*not literally!

January 11th 2010 - Pan Fried Salmon