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Wild Rice & Chicken Soup

Posted in Cooking, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe, soup with tags , , , , , , , on December 15, 2010 by helenphillips
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From this.... (the raw condition)

Wild Rice (which is actually a grass) grows in abundance in Minnesota, so it is unsurprising that it is a favourite in local cuisine. I had my first taste several years ago when we first visited the Twin Cities as part relocation decision making process. We spent a day being taken around various residences by a Real Estate agent so that we could consider where we would like to be living, and importantly, what we needed to budget for. At lunch time, we were taken to Lucia’s in Uptown. Lucia’s is a small restaurant that changes it’s menu weekly in tune with seasonal produce. On this particular day I did not feel like a large lunch, and fortunately for me the Soup of the Day was Wild Rice Soup. Just delicious.

So, when we moved here, wild rice was one of the first store cupboard items I bought, but it’s taken me longer than planned to do anything with it. My husband likes to have soup to take to work for lunch, so I like to keep a stock of various flavours in the freezer – roasted tomato, lentil & tomato, chicken & sweetcorn.   The soup I had at Lucia’s was a creamy one, but here I have left out the cream. It makes a lovely chunky soup, so if you are feeling virtuous you can always omit the side of bread and still feel satisfied. This makes 2 portions suitable for lunch or even an evening meal appetizer.

  • 1/4 cup uncooked wild rice – this gives just under 2 cups when cooked
  • 1 chicken thigh, diced
  • 1 small onion (or large shallot) sliced
  • 5 mushroom – chopped into small pieces
  • 0.5L chicken stock
  • Seasoning

There are 2 ways you can go about this – cook the wild rice ahead, or bung it all in together. I went for the former, because having never cooked wild rice before, I didn’t really know exactly how much it would expand by. You need to use 4 x the amount of water, so in this case 1 cup. Slightly salt, bring to the boil and simmer for around 50 minutes until the rice is cooked and water is absorbed.

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...to this.... (cooked rice)

Using a non-stick pan, I cooked the chicken pieces over a medium heat until sealed. Next I added the onions, and cooked for a few minutes, before adding in the mushrooms. Once the vegetables were soft, I added seasoning, and then the stock. I briefly raised the temperature to bring the soup to the boil, and then reduced to a simmer before adding in the cooked rice. I left it simmering for about 20 minutes, before decanting into pots ready for my husband to pack away for his lunch.

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...to lunch (wild rice soup)

 

Turkey Pie

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , , on December 1, 2010 by helenphillips

Mention pie to the average American, and they will think Apple, Peanut, Pumpkin. Basically anything that can be (optionally) served with cream or ice-cream. Mention pie to the average Briton and they will think Steak & Kidney, Beef & Onion, Chicken & Mushroom. It’s not that we don’t have sweet pies too, it’s just the savoury kind takes precedence in our culinary culture.  I don’t think I’ve seen any savoury pies on sale since we moved here, though of course that doesn’t mean they don’t exist.

With Thanksgiving just last week, I have been left with the inevitable pile of leftover Turkey to try and use ‘creatively’. I find the downside of Turkey is no matter how juicy and moist it is when it’s served fresh, once it has been carved and refrigerated, it has a tendency to dry out. This is why I prefer to use the leftover meat in dishes with some sort of sauce or gravy. The last time I was faced with a similar mountain of Turkey, a pie was top of the list, and so it is again. Tonight we dine on Meat Pie & proper thick cut deep fried chips (not fries!). With malt vinegar.

As usual, I have just thrown in quantities of each ingredient that looks about right so the amounts are approximations. The filling can be used immediately, or prepared in advance.

Gives 4-6 portions.

  • 15 oz / 425g Shortcrust (or pie) pastry (I cheat and use ready made and rolled stuff)
  • 500g Cooked Turkey, cut into small chunks
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion (I used a red one today)
  • 16oz / 500g mushrooms
  • canned sweetcorn
  • 300 ml Stock (I used stock made from the Turkey carcass, you can substitute chicken or vegetable stock)
  • Tarragon, Thyme, Parsley
  • 1 tablespoon Cornflour / Cornstarch, dissolved in cold water
  • Seasoning
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten

Heat the olive oil in a non-stick pan, and then fry the vegetables until they have softened. Next add the herbs, and seasoning, followed by the stock. Bring to the boil, and then reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes, which should reduce the liquid by approximately half. Stir in the Turkey and then the cornflour & water.

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C / 400°F. Grease a deep pan, approx 9″ in diameter.  If necessary, roll the pastry into 2 equally sized pieces, and line the bottom and sides of the pan with one.

Fill the pastry with the prepared filling, and then use the 2nd piece of pastry, and press the 2 pieces together around the edges. Brush the surface with the egg.

Bake in the oven for approx 50 minutes, until the pastry surface is golden brown. Enjoy with vegetables and potato product of your choice.

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Chicken Sliders

Posted in Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , , , on November 17, 2010 by helenphillips

16th November 2010 - Chicken Slider

For the Non-Americans among you, sliders are simply miniature burgers. And as with most food in miniature, there’s something quite special about them. Inspired by the mention of chicken burgers in Gordon Ramsay’s Healthy Appetite, I decided it was time to break out the slider pan. Rather niftily, this press and pan in one makes 6 sliders at a time, which are around 2.5″ in diameter, and around 0.5″ in thickness. Very cute.

Usually home-made burgers are used by mixing minced meat (of whichever variety) together with the rest of the ingredients. I don’t have a mincer, so used the food processor to both chop and blend ingredients. So feel free to experiment!

The following ingredients were used to make a total of 12 sliders. I would estimate that the same amount would make 4 ‘normal’ burgers.

  • 3 chicken thighs
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon each of parsley & chives
  • 1 egg
  • Seasoning

First of all I used the food processor to finely mince the red onion. Next I added the minced garlic, herbs and chicken thighs (rather lazily I threw these in whole, but the blades easily coped!). Once I was satisfied with the chicken was adequately chopped, I added the egg, and seasoning, and ran the food processor long enough to blend the ingredients.

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If you are making burgers the traditional way, then the next stage should be to fashion the mixture into patties, wrap tightly in cling film, and then put them in the fridge for an hour to firm up. Luckily for me (as my burgers ALWAYS fall apart), using the combined press/pan eliminates this. I was able to simply scoop the mixture (using the provided measure) into the pre-heated pan, press, and cook away for about 5 minutes. Of course, there are several alternative ways to the cooking stage – oven grill, outdoor grill / barbecue, griddle. Whichever way you choose, I find brushing a little olive oil on the burger (or the griddle) before cooking prevents sticking. Depending on how thick you make the patties, they should take 5-10 minutes to cook using a medium heat, but as this is chicken, please ensure it is cooked right through before serving!

All that remains are the final touches – add the sliders/burgers to buns loaded with your favourite items. In my case, I had green salad, tomato, burger relish and ketchup. These sliders fit perfectly into just half a small bun! Out of view is the huge pile of oven cooked potato wedges that I served as a side dish.

Baked Eggs

Posted in Breakfast, Brunch, Cooking, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , , on July 13, 2010 by helenphillips


I’ve been needing a break in my breakfast routine, so I was excited to come across Baked Eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s ‘World Kitchen’. Apparently it’s a British recipe that in my 30-odd years has thus far bypassed me.  However, a quick Google shows me that there are billions of variations – from plain eggs cooked in ramekins without any added ingredients, to some with more exotic ingredients, to eggs baked in edible cups. Some are single portions, other use bigger ramekins for double eggs.

Gordon’s recipe uses wild mushrooms and cream, of which I had neither, so I improvised and adapted. I had some ordinary white mushrooms, and milk in the fridge, so they would have to do. I have ramekins that are 3.5″/9cm in diameter (perfect for soufflé!) and as I was hungry (and possibly a bit greedy), I filled 2 of them. Whilst preparing the ingredients, the oven was pre-heated to 375°F / 190ºC.  The step I forgot was to lightly grease the dishes to avoid sticking (so take this as a tip!).

I sliced the mushrooms into small pieces (I used 3, but could have used a few more to really pack out the dish), and one very small onion (it was actually the size of a large shallot). These were then pan fried with some melted butter (obviously a bit of olive oil would be a bit healthier). Be careful not to cook the mushrooms for more than a few minutes, as they will continue to cook in the oven. The mixture was then divided into the 2 ramekins, and I used a spoon to create a hollow like a volcano crater. The eggs are then broken into the hollow (for once I managed not to break either yolk!).

I then spooned a little milk around the edges of each bowl, and added some seasoning, and then put the pots into the oven. I started checking progress after 10 minutes, but it actually took 15 minutes before I was satisfied. This resulted in properly cooked egg white, but a lovely runny yolk.  I served with some slices of hot toast, and a spoon to scoop the contents onto the toast, or directly into my mouth. I think this is a dish that is a bit fiddly to do every morning, but is one I definitely will be experimenting further with in the future.

Beef Skewers with Stuffed Peppers…

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe, Summer with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 20, 2010 by helenphillips

…as well as corn-on-the-cob and a bit of salad.

Despite the lack of barbecue equipment, the hot weather means that summer themed dinners are high on the agenda. The best way to cook kebabs or skewers is always going to be over charcoal, but they are still delicious cooked by indoor methods such as the grill. I use a grilling machine, which also means that they can be cooked pretty quickly. You do have to keep a close eye on them, and keep rotating them so that they don’t dry out.

Beef Skewers with Red Onion

These are very simple to put together. Firstly, the beef needs to be marinaded for an hour. If this can be done overnight, then even better. Prepare the beef by cutting into even sized cubes (I used around 240g / 0.5 lbs for 2 servings). Put the cubes into a bowl with 1 tablespoon of soy sauce, and some chilli sauce. How much chilli sauce depends on personal taste, and what sauce you are using. We are currently using Sriracha hot sauce (no, I don’t know how it’s pronounced, and yes, it is hot). I’m a bit of a lightweight, so added just 1/2 teaspoon to the sauce, and put the bottle on the table so Eddie could add extra to his.

Once the beef has stewed in it’s own juices for a while, it’s time for the impaling. For tonight’s feast, I simply alternated the meat with some red onion (I used 1/2 a large one). Cherry tomatoes are always delicious on skewers, but awful to clean off the grilling machine afterwards. Other alternatives are mushrooms or peppers, but I used both in the accompanying dish.

Stuffed Peppers

They say that everything in the US in bigger (whoever ‘they’ may be). If the bell peppers (aka sweet peppers) in my local supermarket are anything to go by, then ‘they’ are correct. So big, I felt that half a pepper per person was quite adequate as an accompaniment to the skewers. To keep it simple, I decided on a filling of spring onions (aka green onions) and mushrooms. There are several ways of cooking a stuffed pepper, but as I’d left it rather late in the day, I opted for a quick and dirty method.

  • Pre-heat the oven to 375°F / 190°C
  • To prepare the pepper, remove the stalk, but cutting around it, and then chop in half. Remove the seeds and the white ‘seams’ (what’s the real name for these?). Bring some water to the boil, add the peppers to the pan, and boil for 5 minutes.
  • Chop 3 or 4 mushrooms, and 2 or 3 spring onions, and dry fry in a non-stick pan. Once they have started to soften add 1/4 cup (60ml) of rice, and enough water to cover. Bring to the boil, and simmer until the rice is almost cooked (it should still have some ‘bite’ as it will finish cooking inside the peppers). Season to taste.
  • Once all components are ready, carefully spoon the rice mixture inside the peppers. This is the part I find most difficult due to my distinct lack of grace! Wrap the peppers in foil, and bake in the oven for around 15 minutes. The foil parcel keeps everything nicely moist, and cooks the rice.

Chicken Risotto

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, Food, Home Cooked Food, recipe with tags , , , , on January 13, 2010 by helenphillips

Ages and ages ago, I posted a mushroom risotto recipe, which had been created from a seemingly bare cupboard. The challenge was slightly different this time – I had chicken, chicken stock, and needed something to fulfil my new and exciting(!) diet regimen – and isn’t as pretty!  As always, we had lots of Arborio rice in the store cupboard (so much in fact, we’re going to have to eat a lot of it before moving!), so risotto seemed a viable option. Being new to this WeightWatchers milarky, I thought I’d check their site to see how risotto fits in which their concept. I very easily found a recipe for mushroom risotto, for 5 points, so it would seem that the rice isn’t too bad a thing. This encouraged me to make up my own chicken version, also using what vegetables I had. So, here’s what I came up with for 6.5 points:

  • Spray light (around 5 sprays)
  • 15g dried mushrooms (I used Asda’s ‘Exotic Mix’)
  • 30g roasted chicken (leftover from Sunday in this case)
  • 1 garlic clove (or teaspoon if using a lazy version)
  • 60g courgette
  • 40g white mushrooms
  • 70g red onion, finely chopped
  • 60ml white wine (you can use red, but I find it turns the rice pink!)
  • 75g Arborio rice
  • 375ml chicken stock (I make my own, making sure any fat is skimmed off)
  • Salt’n’Pepper to taste

Soak the dried mushrooms in enough hot water to cover, according to the packet instructions. Heat a non-stick pan, and spray with the fry light. Add in onion, and cook gently for a few minutes, before stirring in the garlic, white mushrooms, and courgette. When the vegetables have softened, stir in the rice, and then the wine. Stir occasionally until the wine is absorbed. Then start to add the stock, a little at a time, remembering to keep stirring so that it doesn’t stick. Add more stock as it gets absorbed. Once all the stock is added, test the rice to see if it is ready. You may need a little extra water, but I didn’t find that to be the case. Season to taste.

Of course, if you want to push the boat out, stir in a little butter and/or parmasan at the end!

January 12th 2010 - Chicken Risotto

The Countdown Begins

Posted in Cooking, Dinner, general, Home Cooked Food, Photography, recipe with tags , , , on January 8, 2010 by helenphillips

Yesterday I did a Very Scary Thing at work. I handed in my resignation. And if all goes to plan, we will be doing a Marginally Scary Thing in April. We’ll be relocating, approximately 4000 miles away, across the Atlantic Ocean to a new continent. Minneapolis in fact, described by Stephen Fry as the coldest city in the USA!  Britain is in the grip of a ‘Big Freeze’, with local temperatures tonight expected to be -14°C (6.8°F), but this is nothing to what we can expect next winter. Today’s temperature is -23°C / -9.4°F, gulp!

Disappointing, I haven’t been able to get out and about to take any snow photos yet. But tomorrow is Saturday, so hopefully I can wander around locally and make up for it.

So, thus far this week, my photos have mostly been of food (surprise, surprise!).  One of my favourite things to do after having roast chicken on a Sunday is to make stock from the carcass, and (among other things) then to make soup. This week’s was a bit of a variation on the usual, but consisted of chicken(!), mushrooms, carrots, spring onions, sweetcorn, and teeny bit of ginger. A glug of sweet chilli sauce adds a bit of tang, and some tomatoes thrown in near cooking completion adds to the flavour.  Served with some wholemeal rolls, it’s delicious, warming and pretty healthy. And yet another opportunity to make sure I’m getting lots of veg.

Chicken Soup

A few days I posted my recipe for Tagliatelle al Ragu and tonight we had the leftovers, served with a rather delicious (and healthy!) salad, consisting of mixed leaves, cherry tomatoes, celery and spring onions. I was sadly excited to discover Balsamic Glaze a few months ago, because now I can make my dishes look pretty as well as tasty!

January 8th 2010 - Salad!